Legal working age

Serving alcoholic beverages in restaurants. As a messenger for delivering letters, telegrams, packages or bundles to any house of prostitution or assignation. During school hours except where specifically permitted. However, the employer must inform the Commissioner of Labour within 30 days of his employment, and submit a medical certificate certifying his fitness for work. Part of the Politics series on.

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Allowed states (14)

Occupations involving power driven equipment, tools, saws or machinery bakery machines, paper product machines, and metal-forming, punching and shearing machines. A minor may not work more than six days per week. Minors are limited to working no more than 10 hours in a day, with a weekly average of 8 hours per day. Combined hours of school and work cannot exceed 48 hours in a work week.

Special hours apply to workers in agricultural processing. Fridays and Saturdays, during school vacation periods, and during periods when a minor is not regularly enrolled in school. Approval may be granted for and year-olds to work beyond the starting and ending times specified in the Youth Employment Standards Act. Minors are prohibited from working in the following capacities: Working with hazardous materials such as explosives.

Operating power-driven machinery, including motor vehicles. On or about construction sites. Minors under 16 may not work: For more than 40 hours a week or more than eight hours per hour period, except in agricultural operations.

During school hours on school days without an employment certificate issued by the appropriate school officials. Minors over 16 but under 18 may not work: Later than 11 p. With written permission from a parent or guardian, these hours may be expanded to Minors under the age of 17 are not permitted to operate vehicles used for transportation purposes. Only between the hours of 6 a. Prohibited from working more than 8 hours in a day and 44 hours in a week.

Child labor laws in the State of Mississippi do not apply to minor workers who are married before they reach the age of Under 16 during the regular school term: Any power driven machinery, except lawn and garden machinery used in domestic service at or around a private residence, provided that, there shall be an agreement between an occupant of the private residence and the child, and by no other person, firm or corporation, other than a parent, legal custodian or guardian of the child, for the performance of such work.

The oiling, cleaning, maintenance, or washing of machinery. Any ladders, scaffolding, or their substitute. Any mine or quarry except in offices or at other nonhazardous employment. Stone cutting or polishing except those found in jewelry type business.

Any plant manufacturing, processing, storing, or transporting Type A and B explosives, ammunition, or like materials, or in an establishment in which sales of Type A and B explosive materials make up fifty percent or more of gross sales. The operation of any motor vehicle.

Any blast furnace, rolling mill, foundry, forging shop, or in any establishment where heating of metals is carried on or where cold rolling, stamping, shearing, punching, of metal stock is carried on. Saw mills, cooperage stock mills, or where woodworking machinery is used. The operation of freight elevators, hoisting machines or cranes, or on or about any manlifts. Occupations involving exposure to ionizing or nonionizing radiation or any radioactive substance. Any occupation involving exposure to any toxic or hazardous chemicals.

Any capacity in or about a motel, resort, hotel, where sleeping accommodations are furnished except in offices or locations physically separated from the sleeping accommodations. Any place or establishment in which intoxicating alcoholic liquors or beverages are manufactured, bottled, stored, or sold for consumption on or off the premises, except in establishments where at least fifty percent of the gross sales consist of goods, merchandise, or commodities other than alcoholic beverages. No child under sixteen years of age shall be employed or permitted to work in any street occupation connected with peddling, begging, door-to-door selling or any activity pursued on or about any public street or public place.

This prohibition does not apply to any public school or church or charitable fund-raising activity, or distribution of literature relating to a registered political candidate. Any other occupation or place of employment dangerous to the life, limb, health, or morals of children under the age of sixteen.

A child shall not be employed, permitted or suffered to work at any gainful employment for more than three hours per day in any school day, more than eight hours in any nonschool day, more than six days or forty hours in any week.

Normal work hours shall not begin before seven o'clock in the morning nor extend to after 9: The provisions of this subsection may be waived by the director, in full or in part, depending upon the nature of the employment. Such waiver shall be provided in writing to the employer by the director. On all evenings from Labor Day to June first, a child shall not be employed, permitted or suffered to work at any gainful employment after 7: The regional fair exception shall not apply to those entities covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The provisions of this subsection do not apply to children who have been permanently excused from school pursuant to the provisions of chapter None 18 years of age to work as a server in a restaurant that sells alcohol and to sell alcohol in retail stores Work hour restrictions: May not work during school hours, except as provided for in Work Experience and Career Exploration Programs approved by the department or the office of public instruction. Working is permitted from 7 a.

Maximum 3 hours on a school day. Maximum 18 hours in a school week. Maximum 8 hours on a non-school day. Maximum 40 hours in a non-school week. None 19 years of age to work as a server in a restaurant that sells alcohol and to sell alcohol in retail stores Work hour restrictions: None See federal law.

The preparation of any composition in which dangerous or poisonous acids are used. The manufacture of paints, colors or white lead. Dipping, drying or packing matches. The manufacture of goods for immoral purposes. Any mine, coal breaker, quarry, smelter, ore reduction works, laundry, tobacco warehouse, cigar factory or other factory where tobacco is manufactured or prepared. Any distillery, brewery or any other establishment where malt or alcoholic liquors are manufactured, packed, wrapped or bottled.

Any glass furnace, smelter, the outside erection and repair of electric wires, the running or management of elevators, lifts or hoisting machines, or oiling hazardous or dangerous machinery in motion. Switch tending, gate tending, or track repairing. No child under the age of 16 years shall be employed or permitted or suffered to work as a brakeman, fireman, engineer, motorman or conductor upon any railroad in or about establishments where nitroglycerin, dynamite, dualin, guncotton, gunpowder or other high or dangerous explosives are manufactured, compounded or stored.

No child under the age of 16 years shall be employed or permitted or suffered to work in any other employment declared by the Labor Commissioner to be dangerous to the lives or limbs, or injurious to the health or morals, of children under the age of 16 years.

Minors under 18 may not work: In begging, receiving alms, or in any mendicant occupation. In any indecent or immoral exhibition or practice. In any practice or exhibition dangerous or injurious to life, limb, health or morals. As a messenger for delivering letters, telegrams, packages or bundles to any house of prostitution or assignation.

In any public dance hall within this State where alcoholic beverages are dispensed. In any area of a casino where there is gaming or where the sale of alcoholic beverages is the primary commercial activity unless the minor is in the casino area to provide entertainment pursuant to an employment contract. Maximum 48 hours in 1 week, and 8 hours in 1 day.

Under 16 16 and over: But written permission of parents is needed. None 17 years of age to work as a server in a restaurant that sells alcohol and to sell alcohol in retail stores Work hour restrictions: Minors aged 12—15 years may not work: More than 3 hours per day, and maximum 23 hours per school week.

More than 8 hours per day, and maximum 48 hours per school week. Minors aged 16 and 17 years may not work: Enrolled in school More than 6 consecutive days, nor more than 30 hours peer week during the school calendar week. More than 6 consecutive days, nor more than 48 hours peer week during the school vacation weeks or summer vacation. Not enrolled in school In manufactoring more than 10 hours per day, nor more than 48 hours per week. Night work is restricted to no more than 8 hours by shift and 48 hours per week.

At construction work, including wrecking, demolition, roofing, or excavating operations and the painting or exterior cleaning of a building structure from an elevated surface. Involving the operation of circular saws, band saws, and guillotine shears. In or about a slaughtering and meat-packing establishment, or rendering plant. Involving the operation of power-driven woodworking, metal-forming, metal-punching, metal-shearing, bakery and paper products machines.

Involving the operation of power-driven hoisting apparatus, the manufacture of brick, tile, and like products and exposure to radioactive substances or ionizing radiation, or exposure to silica or other harmful dust. Like logging occupations and occupations in the operation of any sawmill, lath mill, shingle mill, or cooperage-stock mill. In mining or in connection with a mine or quarry.

As a helper on a motor vehicle. In the care or operation of a freight or passenger elevator, except that minor over 16 may operate automatic, push-button control elevators.

In manufacturing, packing, or storing of explosives, or in the use or delivery of explosives. Operating or using any emery, tripoli, rouge, corundum, stone, silicon carbide, or any abrasive, or emery polishing or buffing wheel, where articles of the baser metals or iridium are manufactured.

Adjusting belts to machinery or cleaning, oiling, or wiping machinery Packing paints, dry colors, or red or white leads. Preparing any composition in which dangerous or poisonous acids are used.

Operating steam boilers subject to section of the Labor Law. In penal or correctional institutions, if the job relates to the custody or care of prisoners or inmates. These rules do not apply to: Workers younger than 18 who are apprentices individually registered in DOL registered apprenticeship programs. Student-learners enrolled in recognized cooperative vocational training programs. Trainees in approved on-the-job training programs.

Workers 16 or 17 years old who have completed training as a student learner or trainee in an approved on-the-job training program. Workers 16 or 17 years old who have completed a training program given by a public school or a non-profit institution that includes DOL approved safety instruction. Any factory work, except in delivery and clerical employment in an enclosed office of a factory or in dry cleaning stores, shoe repair shops, and similar service stores.

Operating or assisting in operating any machinery unless all moving parts other than keys, levers, or handles are so guarded as to prevent any part of the person or clothing for the operator from touching them.

Painting or exterior cleaning in connection with the maintenance of a building or structure. Operating washing, grinding, cutting, slicing, pressing, or mixing machinery.

Work at institutions in the Department of Mental Health. Places of entertainment as a rope or wirewalker or gymnast, unless protected by the use of safety devices or protective equipment that comply with the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Act. Peddling; drug traffic; or any practice, exhibition, or place dangerous or injurious to life, limb, or morals. Minors aged 14 and 15 may maximum work: When school is in Session: When school is not in Session: Minors aged 16 and 17 may maximum work: Minors aged 12 or 13 may maximum work: Minors aged 11 to 18 may maximum work: Minors aged 14 to 18 may maximum work: New York child labour law: No child under 16 years of age shall be employed or permitted to work in, or about, or in connection with any mill, factory, cannery, workshop, manufacturing or mercantile establishment, laundry, bakery, office, hotel, restaurant, barber shop, boot-black stand, public stable, garage, place of amusement, brick yard, lumber yard, or any messenger or delivery service.

Newspaper and magazine carrier: Newspaper and magazine carrier boys, operating on fixed routes, are not classified as being employed in street trades. Boys under 16 and over 14 may be employed as carrier boys, under regular employment certificates, between 5: These hours are fixed by Sec.

Nothing in the above rulings shall be construed to prohibit a boy under 14 years of age from selling and delivering magazines and periodicals in the vicinity of his home and under the supervision of his parents.

Girls under 16 years of age will not be permitted to engage in any form of street trades. Boys 12 and 13 years of age may engage in various forms of street trades during the time school. The employment of any child under the age of 14 years in a place of amusement is illegal.

Minors under the age of 16 may maximum work: No child under 16 years of age except newspaper carrier boys may be employed or permitted to work before 6: No child under 16 years of age shall be employed or permitted to work in, as or about, or in connection with: Employment involving the use of any power driven machinery. Construction work other than cleaning, errandrunning, moving, stacking, loading, or unloading materials by hand. Lumbering or logging operations and Sawmills or planing mills.

Manufacture, disposition, or use of explosives. Operation of any steam boiler, steam machinery, or steam generating apparatus, operation or assisting in the operation of laundry machinery and operating or assisting in the operation of passenger or freight elevators Preparing any composition in which dangerous or poisonous acids are used Work in a mine or quarry.

Manufacture of goods for immoral purposes. Any other employment not herein specifically enumerated that may be considered dangerous to life or limb or in which health may be injured or morals depraved. Occupations which involve working on an elevated surface, with or without the use of safety equipment, including ladders and scaffolds in which the work is performed higher than six feet off of the ground. Security positions or occupations that require the use of a firearm or other weapon. Door-to-door sales of any kind.

Occupations involving the loading, handling, mixing, applying, or working around or near any fertilizers, herbicides, fungicides, pesticides, insecticides, or any other chemicals, toxins, or heavy metals. Occupations in or in connection with medical or other dangerous wastes. Occupations which involve the handling or storage of blood, blood products, body fluids, and body tissues. Cooking, baking, grilling, or frying.

Warehouse or storage work. Trucking or commercial driving. Additionally, any employment which would compel the person to remain standing constantly is prohibited. No child under 18 years of age shall be employed or permitted to work in, as or about, or in connection with: Occupations involving slaughtering, meat-packing, processing or rendering.

Power-driven bakery machines, paper products machines, metal forming, punching and shearing machines, woodworking machines and hoisting apparatus. Occupations involved in the manufacture of brick, tile and kindred products. Occupations involved in the manufacture of chemicals. Manufacturing or storage occupations involving explosives. Occupations involving exposure to radioactive substances and to ionizing radiations. Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven circular saws, band saws and guillotine shears.

Occupations in connection with mining, other than coal. Maritime and longshoreman occupations. Wrecking, demolition, and shipbreaking. No person under 16 shall be employed: During school hours except where specifically permitted. For more than 3 hours a day in any school day; For more than 18 hours in any school week. For more than 8 hours in any day when school is not in session.

For more than 40 hours in any week that school is not in session nor during school hours, unless employment is incidental to bona fide programs of vocational cooperative training, work-study, or other work-oriented programs with the purpose of educating students, and the program meets standards established by the state board of education.

No person 16 or 17 who is required to attend school shall be employed: Only between the hours of 7 a. Working is not allowed during school hours. Minors over the age of 16 may maximum work: Prohibited Occupations for all Minors in Entertainment: Activities that have a high level of inherent danger including activities involving speed, height, a high level of physical exertion and highly specialized gear or spectacular stunts.

An act that constitutes sexual abuse or sexual exploitation of minors. Boxing, sparring or wrestling, except for a bona fide athletic or recognized amateur competition or activity or non-contact portrayal. Assisting performers in animal act, conducting an animal into a ring or on stage, or riding an animal when the animal exceeds half the weight of the child performer.

Prohibited Occupations for all Minors: Brickmaker Crane-, elevator operator Electrical worker Excavator Explosives manufacturing Forest firefighting, Forest service, Mill worker Meat processing Motion picture projectionist Motor vehicles Exception for occasional driving for licensed 17 year olds with state approved driver education course, if vehicle does not exceed 6, pounds and has restraining device, driving is during daylight, within 30 mile radius of employer, and limited to 2 trips per day away from employer location.

Performing arts students engaged in uncompensated exhibitions may perform at a licensed establishment, under proper supervision in accordance with the Liquor Code. On boats Pilot, fireman or engineer on any boat or vessel. On machinery Including repairing, cleaning or oiling machinery in motion and operating or assisting in the operation of the following: Except for 16 and 17 year olds setting up, adjusting, repairing, oiling and cleaning lightweight, small capacity, portable counter-top power-driven food mixers comparable to models intended for household use.

Exception does not apply to setting up, adjusting, repairing, oiling or cleaning of pizza-dough rollers. In metal industries In mines Dangerous occupations in or around any mine, including all work performed in any underground working, open-pit, or surface part of any coal-mining plant, that contribute to the extraction, grading, cleaning or other handling of coal.

Exceptions for year olds: Exception, 14 and 15 year old minors may work in office and perform clerical duties. In the printing and paper industry Around radioactive substances On railroads and railways On rivets Heating and passing rivets, except for 16 and 17 year old minors 10 feet or less from ground or on a scaffold equipped with guardrails and board In tanneries Additional Prohibited Occupations for Minors Under Amusement park ride attendant, operator, or dispatcher.

Baker and Cook Boiler or engine room worker Chicken catcher Catching and cooping of poultry in preparation for transport or for market Construction worker Hoisting apparatus Industrial homework Lifeguard Public messenger Stzrike or lockouts Prohibited to work in an establishment where a strike or lockout is in progress, unless the minor was legally certified to work in an establishment prior to the declaration of a strike or lockout.

Minors Under 16 are also Prohibited from Working: In establishments where alcoholic beverages are produced, sold or dispensed Except for continuing-care retirement homes, ski resorts, bowling alleys, golf courses, amusement parks and other similar recreational establishments where alcoholic beverages are served as long as the minor is not handling or serving alcohol, and not working in an area where alcohol is served or stored.

Performing Arts students engaged in uncompensated exhibitions may perform at a licensed establishment, under proper supervision in accordance with the Liquor Code. On coal dredges In freezer or meat coolers On highways In manufacturing Any manufacturing or mechanical process On machinery In pattern making shops In the printing industry For public utilities In any capacity, except office work such as filing, typing and the cleaning and dusting of an office.

On scaffolding On trucks, railcars, and conveyors In tunnels In warehousing and storage. Minors aged 14 or 15 may maximum work: Minors aged 16 or 17 may maximum work: Any manufacturing or mining job. Processing occupations such as filleting of fish, dressing poultry, cracking nuts or laundering. Occupations with duties in workplaces where goods are manufactured, mined or processed. Operating or tending of hoisting apparatus or of any power-driven machinery other than office machines and machines in retail, food service and establishments.

Occupations in connection with: To serve, sell or handle alcohol Work hour restrictions: If you're , you may not be employed: More than 40 hours per week. More than 48 hours per week. More than nine hours a day. Without an 8-hour respite between the end of a shift on one day and the start of work the next day.

Minors under the age of May generally not work. Minors under age 14 may work in any aspect of show business, such as acting or performing in a theatrical, television, radio, or film production. Minors ages 12 and 13 may work during non-school sessions in non-hazardous farm jobs with written parental consent. At any age, minors may work in any business or establishment solely owned and operated by the parent of the minor. Minors ages 14 and 15 may work in office, clerical and sales jobs.

They also may work in a number of jobs in retail, food service and gasoline service establishments, such as: Cashiering, price marking and tagging by hand or machine Assembling orders, packing and shelving. Bagging and carrying out orders. Serving foods and beverages. Car washing and polishing Operating gas pumps and performing other courtesy services Cleaning vegetables and fruits and wrapping, sealing, labeling, weighing, pricing and stocking goods.

Delivery and errand work by foot, bicycle or public transportation. May work unrestricted, exceptions: Manufacturing or storing explosives Driving a motor vehicle and being an outside helper Coal mining Logging and sawmilling Power-driven woodworking machines Exposure to radioactive substances and to ionizing radiations Power-driven hoisting apparatus Power-driven metal-forming, punching and shearing machines Mining, other than coal mining Meat packing or processing Power-driven bakery machines Power-driven paper products machines Manufacturing brick, tile, and related products Power-driven circular saws, band saws and guillotine shears Wrecking, demolition, and ship-breaking operations Roofing operations Excavation operations Selling, serving or waitressing alcohol: In order to work as a bartender in any facility that sells open containers of alcohol, a person must be at least twenty-one years of age.

In order to work as a server, waiter or waitress and serve open containers of alcohol, a person must be at least eighteen years of age.

In order to work in any capacity in a retail liquor store, wholesale liquor business, or a distillery, a person must be at least twenty-one years of age. Minors ages 14 and 15 may not work: More than 18 hours during school weeks. More than 3 hours on school days. More than 40 hours in non-school weeks. More than 8 hours on non-school days. Minors ages 16 and 17 - Unrestricted. South Carolina Child Labor Statute: Minors under the age of 14 may only work in or as: Child actors Jobs pumping gas or detasselling hybrid seed corn Employment by parents Employment necessary for the child's support or employment using agricultural equipment.

Minors aged 14 or 15 may not work under following conditions: In any occupation dangerous to life, health or morals. Under 18 Minors aged 16 or 17 - Unrestricted. Federal laws create requirements that are more stringent in many cases!

Selling, serving or waitressing alcohol: The age differs by license. In order to sell beer in a grocery store, a person must be at least eighteen years of age. In order to sell, stock or handle sealed beer in a grocery store a person must be at least twenty-one years of age. The sale of malt beverages constitutes less than fifty percent of the gross business transacted by that establishment, an employee who is 18 years of age or older may sell, serve or dispense malt beverages as long as the licensee or an employee who is at least 21 years of age is on the premise.

No one under the age of 21 may tend bar or draw or mix alcoholic beverages. Sales of alcoholic beverages may only be made by a person who is at least 21 years of age. Minors under the age of 14 may not work: Later than 7 p. Minors under the age of 16 may not work: For more than four hours per school day or 20 hours per school week.

For more than eight hours per non-school day or 40 hours per non-school week. Later than 10 p. Minors aged 16 or 17 - Unrestricted. None - see federal laws. Minors aged 14 or 15 may not work: More than 18 hours a week during a school week. More than 8 hours a day on non-school days; or More than 40 hours a week during non-school weeks. Minors aged 16 and 17 may not work: During those hours when the minor is required to attend classes.

Between the hours of Then the minor may work until midnight no more than three nights Sunday through Thursday. Forms shall remain valid until the end of the school year in which it is submitted or until termination of employment, whichever shall occur first. Minimum employment age Restricted by the Labour laws Restricted working hours and the type of work. Generally, a child must be at least 13 years of age before he can start working.

Young persons above 15 may work in an industrial environment. However, the employer must inform the Commissioner of Labour within 30 days of his employment, and submit a medical certificate certifying his fitness for work. Generally speaking, a person who is above the age of 16 is not a child or a young person, and is considered an adult worker Unrestricted. A worker aged fifteen years old, shall be considered as a child worker. No child worker and no worker aged sixteen or seventeen years old shall be permitted to do work that is potentially dangerous or hazardous in nature.

Easy work performed at school holidays Easy work performed at school holidays; Maximum 6 hours per day, with minimum 1 hours break; Minimum 2 following days of rest per week Maximum 8 hours per day, with minimum 1 hours break; Minimum 2 following days of rest per week Unrestricted; No person under the age of 16 is allowed to work in Armenia [46].

With many restrictions within a family setting With minor restrictions assuming compulsory school years have been finished Easy work with the permission from parents or legal guardians Limited working hours up to 35 hours per week Must have completed 2 years of secondary education; restricted to light work Restricted to light work; Restricted working hours Only for jobs as film actor or model; Strictly regulated Strictly regulated 16 Minimum working age; Some occupations prohibited Only under special circumstances Restricted occupations and working hours Only for activities in the cultural or artistic field.

However, a police authorization must be obtained for these activities in advance. Children 13—15 years of age may only perform light work, that is not in the vicinity of machinery. Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan concluded that pay-to-play daily fantasy is illegal under state law. Litigation involving FanDuel and DraftKings remains ongoing, with both companies continuing to operate in the state.

At the same time, Illinois lawmakers have considering DFS legislation. In a detailed page memo, the office of the attorney general concluded that "daily fantasy sports cannot be offered in Nevada without licensure. Daily fantasy sports have the attention of Attorney General Marty Jackley. Legislative activity pertaining to DFS stalled in Arizona is one of five states where cash-based DFS play has long been considered banned.

A prior attorney general's opinion found fantasy football to be considered gambling. A legislative bill to legalize DFS was introduced. The state bans play in games "for any sum of money.

In , then-Attorney General William J. The Louisiana legislature considered a DFS bill during the session. Under state law, internet-based fantasy sports leagues are illegal. Montana is not currently considering any amendment to its law. The Montana Lottery offers pay-to-play fantasy football and racing contests. However, state lawmakers held hearings to debate a proposed law that would define certain daily fantasy contests as games of skill and remove them from the state's overall ban on cash-based fantasy games over the internet.

Other DFS bills have been introduced, too. The California legislature has considered a DFS bill in prior years but a law has yet to be enacted. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, gambling in California requires a "bet or wager. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Connecticut follows a "predominance test" where the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

A DFS legislative bill has been introduced. DFS-friendly legislation has been introduced but stalled in May In , former Florida Attorney General Bob Butterworth concluded that certain forms of season-long fantasy sports probably would be illegal under Florida law.

According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Kentucky follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

A DFS legislative bill was introduced. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, gambling in Maine requires a "bet or wager. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, gambling in Michigan requires a "bet or wager. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Minnesota follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

DFS legislation was introduced in the state. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Nebraska follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible. A legislative bill pertaining to DFS was introduced in the state. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, gambling in New Jersey requires a "bet or wager.

According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, New Mexico follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible. A legislative bill pertaining to DFS has been introduced in the state. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, North Carolina follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

A DFS-related legislative bill has been introduced. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Ohio follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

A legislative bill was introduced to regulate and permit DFS. Wagering on games of chance is banned in Oklahoma. In , according to a court filing in the New York litigation, the Oklahoma attorney general probed a private "money hunt" contest among dog owners competing for cash based on their dog's ability to track prey.

The Oklahoma AG concluded that such cash-based contests qualified as a bet under state law. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Oregon follows a "material factor" test. Oregon held hearings in to consider a DFS-friendly bill. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Pennsylvania follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

According to a court document released in the New York litigation, South Carolina's definition of gambling "includes betting money on the outcome of any 'game,' regardless of the skill involved in the game. In a decision dated July 7, , the West Virginia attorney general concluded that: According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Wisconsin follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

A legislative bill pertaining to DFS has been introduced that would serve to specifically legalize daily fantasy in the state. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Alaska follows a "material factor" test.

In , the Alaska attorney general decided that a pay-to-play golf video game constituted illegal gambling. No current DFS legislation is pending in Alaska. In a widely reported statement, North Dakota Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem said, "If [DFS is] a game of chance, it's not likely legal, and if it's a game of skill, then it would likely be legal. However, in , then-Attorney General Heidi Heitkamp concluded that a certain fantasy football contest might constitute an impermissible "sports pool" and, in turn, be considered illegal gambling.

The opinion letter did not discuss DFS in its current form. Daily fantasy advertisements were recently removed from certain University of North Dakota athletic facilities. No DFS-related legislation is pending in the state. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Utah -- a state with perhaps the strictest gambling laws in the nation -- follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible.

No DFS legislative bill appears pending. According to a legal opinion letter released in the New York litigation, Wyoming follows a "predominance test" in which the relative levels of skill and chance are measured to determine if the contest is permissible. No fantasy-related legislative bill appears pending. To help make this website better, to improve and personalize your experience and for advertising purposes, are you happy to accept cookies and other technologies? Where is daily fantasy sports legal?

A state-by-state look d Ryan Rodenberg. Congress indicates it may act on sports betting 2d David Purdum. Congress to take closer look at sports betting 9d David Purdum.

Recently contested states (9)